perpetual spinach

perpetual spinach / Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla var. cicla

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approx 250 seeds £1.49
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy perpetual spinach perpetual spinach / Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla var. cicla: A super-reliable cut and come again crop

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, moisture-retentive soil

    Enjoy all the pleasures of growing spinach without any of the trials and tribulations with this super-reliable leafy vegetable. Big, beefy and productive, it looks like spinach and it tastes like spinach: but unlike spinach it doesn't bolt, even in dry conditions, and it's bone hardy in winter so you can grow it all year round.

  • Growing Instructions:Sow the large, corky seeds direct where they are to grow in shallow drills. Thin seedlings gradually until plants are 20cm apart (the thinnings can be eaten as baby salad leaves). Alternatively, sow one or two seeds at 20cm intervals and pinch out unwanted seedlings, allowing the strongest to grow on. Keep netted against pigeons while young. Pick as a cut-and-come-again crop, taking outside leaves but leaving the crown intact, and plants will continue producing new leaves over a very long period.

  • Sow: March-August

  • Harvest: All year round

  • Approximate quantity: 250 seeds.

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Eventual height & spread

Tasty, abundant and didn't bolt either

5

Followed the instructions and I got 6 months of abundant, deliciously creamy leaves. Next time I'll harvest all the leaves as soon as they are ready, even if I don't get to eat them, in order to keep the cut-and-come-again freshness.

Hattie's pincushion

Cumbria

true

perpetual spinach

5.0 1

100.0

When do I plant potatoes and other veg? When is the best time to plants potatoes? Also can you advise me what veg I could grow now until March with poly tunnels?

Bets Ingram

You can start chitting your early and maincrop seed potatoes in February, but the best time to plant is in early to mid spring. As for growing vegetables in your polytunnels, you have lots of options. Spinach, kale, and some varieties of lettuce will live through the winter in a polytunnel. Certain kinds of onion work well from an autumn sowing, and you'll get a much earlier crop than if you'd waited until spring. Other possibilities are cabbage, Pak Choy, Chinese cabbage, and most root crops. Leeks, beets, carrots, turnips, parsnips and radishes, can be sown for winter harvest

Crocus

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