Yucca filamentosa

2 litre pot £17.99
in stock - arrives before Christmas
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Yucca filamentosa Adam's needle: Towering flower spikes

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: any well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: July and August
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Towering spikes of white, bell-shaped flowers in July and August above clumps of stiff, dark green, lance-shaped leaves. Adam's needle makes an excellent focal point for a sunny, well-drained Mediterranean-style garden. A gravel mulch accentuates the architectural foliage and helps to protect the crown of the plant from frost-damage. The leaves have sharp tips and serrated edges, so it's best not planted where you are going to brush past it.

  • Garden care: During the growing season water well, applying a balanced liquid fertiliser each month Remove the faded flower-spikes at the end of the season.

Delivery options
  • Standard £4.99
  • Next / named day £6.99
  • Click & collect FREE
more info

Eventual height & spread

Not yet flowered but showing strong leaf growth

4

Good strong leaf growth, has gotten slightly bigger since autumn. Not yet flowered but it's my first year having it. Seems to like the aspect - south facing, coastal. It's in a big planter with cana's & pineapple lilys. Looks nice. Not bothered by pests.

Klinkin' katie

East Lothian

true

4537

4.0 1

100.0

Hi, I'm hoping to dig up my established yukka plants and transfer them to individual pots. How deep and wide should the pots be? Thanks.

Jenga

Hello, It really depends on how big the plants are as they should be large enough to prevent the plants toppling over, as well as comfortably accommodate their root systems.

helen

Yucca Dear "person that can me help" My Mum had an Adams Needle (Yucca), she loved it, and it was a strong healthy plant that flowered beautifully every year. Unfortunately my Mother died 17 years ago, so when my brother and I sold 7 years ago, my Aunt offered to re-plant the Yucca in my new garden (due to my lack of gardening knowledge), but she also split it, and planted one half in her garden. 7 years on (and now in my 30s so a keen gardener) the plant hasn't grown or flowered once. My Aunt's on the other hand is big, strong and flowers annually, so I moved it last Saturday into a really sunny spot. Sadly though in doing so the root split. Now I have a piece of root but no growth on it and wonder, can I grow a plant from it? Many thanks and look forward to hearing from you, Beti-jane.

Bets Ingram

Hello Bets, I'm afraid this does not sound great. Your best option now would be to see if there is any section that still has roots on and plant that piece up as soon as you can. Alternatively you can try taking stem cuttings. Stem cuttings can be done in late spring to late summer. Remove a stem and cut between the leaf nodes creating pieces around 10cm long. Remove all the foliage and press the cuttings horizontally into trays of good quality cuttings compost. Put the pot in to a propagator or cover with a clear plastic bag. They usually take about four to six weeks to root. If all else fails you may have to ask your aunt for a cutting. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Which plants are Deer proof? I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.

david

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

What plants would you recommend for my Mediterranean style garden? Our garden is quite well established and has a Mediterranean feel. We have quite a few spaces that need filling and were hoping you could suggest a few things?

Mrs C Taylor

We have several plants that might interest you - here are some of the best Lavandula http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.lavandula/?s=lavandula Cistus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.cistus/?s=cistus Kniphofia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.kniphofia/?s=kniphofia Euphorbias http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.euphorbia/?s=euphorbia Yucca filamentosa http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/yucca-filamentosa-/classid.4537/ Eryngium http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.eryngium/?s=eryngium Sedum http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.sedum/?s=sedum Brachyglottis http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/mediterranean-plants/brachyglottis-dunedin-group-sunshine/classid.4376/ Convolvulus cneorum http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/mediterranean-plants/convolvulus-cneorum-/classid.940/

Crocus

What can I plant in a Mediterranean style garden? I want give my garden a Mediterranean look but I do not know what to plant. Could you please help?

[email protected]

There are quite a few plants that we sell on the website which will give you a mediterranean feel to your garden - here are some of the best any of the Kniphofias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=kniphofia any of the Euphorbias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euphorbia Yucca filamentosa http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=yucca+fil Stipa tenuissima http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1000000022&CategoryID= any of the Eryngiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=eryngium any of the Sedum spectabile http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=sedum+spect any of the Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Erigeron http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=erigeron Brachyglottis compacta Sunshine http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=4376&CategoryID= Convolvulus cneorum http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=940&CategoryID= Phlomis italica http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=phlomis Lavandula x intermedia Dutch Group http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=4046&CategoryID= Festuca glauca http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=Festuca+glauc&x=12&y=10

Crocus

What can I plant that the deers won't eat? What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.

Kelly L. Sliker

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

Seaside

Gardening by the coast offers specific challenges and opportunities. You can take advantage of the mild climate to grow not-so-hardy plants with confidence, but will have to choose them carefully to ensure they can cope with the buffeting winds and salt-

Read full article