Tulipa 'Queen of Night'

single late tulip bulbs

4 5 1 star 1 star 1 star 1 star 1 star (7 reviews) Write review
50% off tulip bulbs
10 bulbs £3.99 £1.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Tulipa 'Queen of Night' single late tulip bulbs: Velvety, dark maroon blooms

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: Apr-May
  • Hardiness: fully hardy
  • Bulb size: 11/12

    These are probably the best loved of the deep purple tulips. Their velvety, dark maroon, single, cup-shaped flowers on straight stems in May are stunning, so they do deserve their acclaim. The almost-black tulips work well in a 'bruised' coloured border, planted between other plum-coloured flowers and foliage plants. Shown here photographed with tulip 'Shirley'

  • Garden care: In September to December plant bulbs 15-20cm deep and 10-15cm apart in fertile, well-drained soil. Alternatively, allow 7-9 bulbs per 30cm sq. After flowering dead-head and apply a balanced liquid fertiliser each week for the first month. Once the foliage has died down naturally lift the bulbs and store in a cool greenhouse.

  • Harmful if eaten/may cause skin allergy
Delivery options
  • Bulb orders £3.99
  • Next / named day £6.99
  • Click & collect FREE
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Eventual height & spread

Notes on Tulipa 'Queen of Night'

"Sultry and dramatic this finely-poised, eye-pleasing tulip looks black in spring sunshine. But its popularity lies in being perennial - coming back year after year if a little smaller in form."

Strong, upright tulip & very reliable.

5

Worth investing in quite a few for full impact.

Happy gardener

Cumbria

true

A bit overblown

3

Planted in pot on patio

Hey Jude

Essex

false

Beautiful, rich colour. Stately and elegant

5

Gorgeous

June

Cheshire

true

Pretty tulips, a classic

4

Lovely tulips, not quite as dark or large as ones I've bought from other suppliers in the past, but really beautiful nonetheless.

Kate F

Brighton

true

Classic tulip

4

Still one of the best

Joyful gardener

Bath

true

I would buy again

5

dark velvety purple: beautiful mixed with lighter shades of pink/white. Not too tall: robust

Sharp eyes

Woking

true

Good quality

5

Grown outside for picking. The flowers are just opening and they all look good.

Robert

Berwickshire

true

Tulipa'Queen of Night'

4.4 7

85.7

2006 Planting Chelsea Flower Show enquiry Hi, I see you have plants available for the current show, but do you have a plant list for the 2006 award winner (Daily Telegraph,Tom Stuart Smith) available as I am interested in buying some of these plants? Thank you for your time, Kelly

kelly mackenzie

Hello Kelly, He did use a lot of plants in his garden - here is a list which includes most. Allium Purple Sensation Anthriscus Ravens Wing Aquilegia Ruby Port Astrantia Claret Carex testacea Cirsium rivulare atropurpureum Dahlia Dark Desire Euphorbia Fireglow Geranium Lily Lovell Geranium phaeum Samobor Geranium Phillipe Valpelle Geranium psilostemmon Geum Princess Juliana Gillenia trifoliata Hakonechloa macra Iris Dusky Challenger Iris Dutch Chocolate Iris Sultan's Palace Iris Superstition Iris Supreme Sultan Knautia macedonica Lavandula angustifolia Nepeta subsessilis Washfield Nepeta Walkers low Purple fennel - Giant Bronze Rodgersia pinnata Superba Rodgersia podophylla Salvia Mainacht Sedum matrona Stachys byzantina Stipa arundinacea (syn.Anemanthele lessoniana) Stipa gigantea Tulip Abu Hassan Tulip Ballerina Tulip Queen of Night Verbascum Helen Johnston I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Tulip Fire

Tips of emerging leaves appear brown and scorched, and often shrivel and rot. The foliage soon becomes covered in a grey fungus. Brown spots appear on the leaves and flowers, which may also rot.

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Plant spring bulbs

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Bulbs are ideal for anyone who rates themselves as 'keen-but-clueless' because they are one of the easiest plants to grow. Provided you plant them at the right time of year at more or less the right depth, they will reward you year after year with a rel

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At some stage in June, your garden will be a glorious affair full of scent and soft flower. Placing a posy from the garden, close to a family hub like the kitchen table, unites your home and garden as effectively as having a huge picture window. You don’t

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Simple but stylish protection

If rabbits, deer, squirrels or cats devour or scratch up your plants these wire mesh protectors will give them time to get established. The pyramid-shaped 'Rabbit Proof Cloche' and dome-shaped 'Squirrel Proof Cloche'

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One of the great things about gardening is being able to look into the future with enthusiasm, and part of that is planting now for next spring. A gardener knows, when handling papery brown bulbs, that these insignificant little things will produce early

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If the budget’s tight or your plot is tiny, potting up a large container will make much more of an impact. It has to be rugged, either frost-proof terracotta, wood or stone, to withstand hard weather. Your compost has to be equally meaty and should conta

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Dark and sultry

Dark, sultry tulips such as 'Queen of Night’ will disappear against the bare earth unless they are mixed with golds, pinks or pallid-yellows. Good golds to weave through dark tulips include 'Cairo' and 'Abu Hassan' and these work well with 'Jan Re

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Tips for your tulips

The most useful garden tulips arrive in the second half of April or in May, after most of the daffodils have flowered. For this reason it’s a good idea not to mix the two because by the time your tulips flower, the daffodils will be past their best.

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