Stipa gigantea

9cm pot £7.99
in stock
3 × 9cm pots £23.97 £21.00
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Stipa gigantea golden oats: Excellent for the back of the border

This grass is semi-evergreen, so it can lose some of its foliage in winter. In colder regions or more exposed gardens, it may lose it all, but then fresh new growth appears again in spring.

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: moderately fertile, medium to light, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: June and July
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Arching stems of glistening, golden, oat-like flowerheads above clumps of slender, grey-green leaves. This majestic semi-evergreen grass is an excellent specimen plant for a sunny, mixed or new perennial border. Perfect for introducing movement, it looks stunning under-planted with the rich purple flowerheads of Allium hollandicum 'Purple Sensation'.

  • Garden care: When planting always wear stout gardening gloves to protect against the sharp edges of the basal leaves. Wearing gloves, comb through the plant in early spring to remove dead foliage.

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Eventual height & spread

Have used before

5

Love this grass - you need room, as once established it is quite spectacular and needs space to show off!

Mak

Lincolnshire

true

2000016494

5.0 1

100.0

I'm considering Golden Oats as a feature in a new herbaceous border, but my garden is rather exposed and prone to strong westerly winds. Will it suffer and break in such a situation? Should I use the shorter Blue Oat Grass instead?

Peggy Sue

Hello, These plants are relatively tough and tend to cope well with exposure to wind, but if it really blows a gale, then yes, it probably will suffer some damage.

Helen

Would it be possibly/sensible to grow this plant in a pot? If so what would be the minimum size? Thank you.

Chocolate egg

Hello, This is a big grass, so ideally it should be planted in the ground. It is possible to grow it in a pot however, but it will be reduced in stature. I would recommend a pot at least 50 x 50cm to house it - even bigger if you can.

helen

2006 Planting Chelsea Flower Show enquiry Hi, I see you have plants available for the current show, but do you have a plant list for the 2006 award winner (Daily Telegraph,Tom Stuart Smith) available as I am interested in buying some of these plants? Thank you for your time, Kelly

kelly mackenzie

Hello Kelly, He did use a lot of plants in his garden - here is a list which includes most. Allium Purple Sensation Anthriscus Ravens Wing Aquilegia Ruby Port Astrantia Claret Carex testacea Cirsium rivulare atropurpureum Dahlia Dark Desire Euphorbia Fireglow Geranium Lily Lovell Geranium phaeum Samobor Geranium Phillipe Valpelle Geranium psilostemmon Geum Princess Juliana Gillenia trifoliata Hakonechloa macra Iris Dusky Challenger Iris Dutch Chocolate Iris Sultan's Palace Iris Superstition Iris Supreme Sultan Knautia macedonica Lavandula angustifolia Nepeta subsessilis Washfield Nepeta Walkers low Purple fennel - Giant Bronze Rodgersia pinnata Superba Rodgersia podophylla Salvia Mainacht Sedum matrona Stachys byzantina Stipa arundinacea (syn.Anemanthele lessoniana) Stipa gigantea Tulip Abu Hassan Tulip Ballerina Tulip Queen of Night Verbascum Helen Johnston I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

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