rosemary Prostratus Group

rosemary / (syn Salvia rosmarinus ) Prostratus Group

5 5 1 star 1 star 1 star 1 star 1 star (6 reviews) Write review
2 litre pot £12.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy rosemary Prostratus Group rosemary / (syn Salvia rosmarinus ) Prostratus Group: Forms a mat of fragrant foliage

    The photos on this page shows the plant with gift wrap. This is not included in the price, however you may add gift wrap (for an additional charge of £4.95) during the order process.

    • Position: full sun
    • Soil: well-drained soil
    • Rate of growth: average
    • Flowering period: April to June
    • Hardiness: frost hardy (needs winter protection in cold areas)

      A low-growing, spreading form of common rosemary, this sends out upright spikes of purple-blue flowers from mid-spring to early summer, among narrow, aromatic, dark green leaves. It's useful as an edging plant for a sunny herb garden or mixed border. While winter frosts may kill off some of the shoots the plant should regenerate from the base. The young leaves are great for flavouring roasted vegetables, lamb and pork.

    • Garden care: To ensure a plentiful supply of young, succulent leaves for culinary use, gather the leaves regularly and prune each spring.

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Eventual height & spread

Fragrant and healthy herb

5

Healthy herb that is thriving. Well packed and arrived in very good condition.

Annie

Kent

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Healthy rosemary

5

Rosmarinus officinalis Prostratus group is an excellent plant for edging a path or border as the grey/green evergreen foliage and pale blue flowers (which can appear at any time of year, but mostly in spring) contrast nicely against stone paving. This variety grows more horizontally than vertically and so is perfect for softening the edges of a terrace or pathway. Over time it grows woody and will need replacing so take cuttings a few years before to grow on!

Foxglove Fiona

West Sussex

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Excellent little plant!

5

This plant is fab. I didn't have room in an urban courtyard garden for full size rosemary, so this was the perfect compact size. It is in a corner of a raised bed and its wavy little branches spill over the edge nicely. It has been in bloom most of the year - a nice bit of purple colour in the garden, especially over winter. An attractive and useful plant.

Deltamae

London

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Yes

5

Three different rosemary plants as a gift for my mother. She has overwintered them in her unheated greenhouse. I think one may have died, it has been very cold. I'll plant them outside in the spring.

Lyn

Glasgow

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Surprised

5

I bought 6 plants for pots rather than planting pansies - as the squirrels were for ever digging them up from the pots along my patio. I was so surprised at the quality and condition - they had obviously been in transit but were delivered as fresh as if they had just been dug from the ground. I will always buy from this site in future to avoid disappointment. Thank you Crocus

Devon Hipster

Torquay, Devon

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Wouldn't like to be without one of these

5

this is in full sun near a warm wall, on a small rockery area. Slow to flower but worth waiting for, it has spread a lot since planting. Ground hugging variety. Seems a happy plant. Bees love it.

Gina

Dorset

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5.0 6

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Will this - or any other rosemary - tolerate being kep in a pot on a patio?

Amanda

Yes, provided the pot is a good size and the plant is kept well fed and watered, it should be fine.

Helen

In the Garden Care section it states: "To ensure a plentiful supply of young, succulent leaves for culinary use, gather the leaves regularly". Do you mean regularly pick off its needle-like leaves rather than take sprigs?

John

Hello, the idea is to take the leaves with a section of stem as this will encourage the plant to become bushier over time.

Helen

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