Nandina domestica 'Fire Power'

2 litre pot £14.99
in stock - arrives before Christmas
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Nandina domestica 'Fire Power' heavenly bamboo: Fiery autumn foliage

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: moist but well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: July
  • Hardiness: frost hardy (needs winter protection in cold areas)

    This compact, rounded shrub produces conical clusters of small, star-shaped white flowers in mid-summer among bamboo-like leaves. In autumn, the leaves turn shades of fiery red and copper and the flowers are followed by shiny, round, scarlet fruits. With several seasons of interest, this dwarf form of heavenly bamboo is a hardworking plant for a sunny spot where border space is limited.

  • Garden care: In mid or late spring lightly cut back any shoots that spoil the symmetry of the plant.

Delivery options
  • Standard £4.99
  • Next / named day £6.99
  • Click & collect FREE
more info

Eventual height & spread

For appropriate situations Nandina are exellent.

5

This is a plant which in my experience takes care of itself once established. Establishment has no pitfalls and the plant copes well with less than congenial planting positions. Growth is slow but steady When newly planted it can look a nondescript cluster of rather unattractive green leaves, but the plants habit of changing colour with the season creates year-round interest (and pleasure). Be patient though it's not a great grower. Since I take account of the fact that I share the garden with the natural world, I should point out that the plants strong points from a horticultural point of view probably detract from its usefulness to wild life Except that it must make very good cover.

Dave ??????????

Outer North London

true

Nandina domestica'Fire Power'

5.0 1

100.0

Hello, I have two of these from you, the first one has grown fabulously but the second hasn't gained an inch in the last 4 years! Had it planted in the ground at first but dug up and potted as it wasn't growing and it looked silly next to its big sister who is stunning, this year I have moved it to a new pot and added some John Innes No3. I do feed and renew compost each spring. The roots are nice and healthy and it produces plenty of new leaves but it just will not grow. Should I cut it back? Any advice will be much appreciated, Thank you.

Carrots

Hello, It can be incredibly frustrating, but if it is putting on new foliage, then it is growing - although maybe not as fast as you would like.... This is a pretty compact plant, that will only reach around 45cm on maturity, so it may take a while to get there!

Helen

Plants suitable for patio pots Hello I wanted to enquire if you have a Sarocococca hookeriana var. humilis, I looked online but it's not listed. I am askng for that particular plant, because I only have a patio and want plants that won't grow to an enormous size or require spectacular care. A rosemary and a dwarf syringa I bought from you are doing very well. Plants always arrive in very good condition which I really appreciate. A Myrtus communis subsp. 'Tarentina' which I potted up immediately in a larger pot suffered shock I think, - I wonder what you know about this myrtle? I am wanting to grow plants on a small patio in containers and wonder if the following plants are suitable:- Sarcococca hookeriana var. humilis (if you have got it) or a Sarcococca hookeriana digyna (which is in your listings). Winter Jasmine, or any of the other Jasmines, Wintersweet, Witchhazel, Abelia grandiflora but would this be too large for my patio- I am thinking of winter cheer with its red berries, and Nandina Domestica. Many thanks Bernadette

Bernadette Matthews

Hello Bernadette, I'm afraid we do not sell Sacrocococca hookeriana var. humilis, but the other two we list will be fine in a large pot as long as they are kept well fed and watered. It is my experience that most plants will cope if the pot is big enough and they are well looked after, however larger plants like the Jasminum nudiflorum, Wintersweet, Witchhazel, Abelia or Nandinas will eventually run out of steam and need to be placed into the garden. You should however be able to get a good few years from them. As for the Myrtus, I have not heard that they particularly dislike being moved, but as they are not fully hardy they need protection in winter. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Which plants are Deer proof? I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.

david

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

What can I plant that the deers won't eat? What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.

Kelly L. Sliker

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

Jungle

The trick to achieving the tropical effect is good preparation and dense planting, vivid foliage, fiery flowers and striking contrasts. The jungle garden is a place for theatrical planning and planting. If you don't have room or the inclination to turn y

Read full article

Japanese

Make the most of over 3000 years of gardening tradition by creating an oriental-style garden. Originally designed as a place for intellectual contemplation and meditation, they are an ideal sanctuary from the pressures of modern living. Japanese gardens a

Read full article