Lathyrus odoratus 'High Scent'

modern grandiflora sweet pea (syn. King's High Scent)

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4 plants £6.99
in stock
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Buy Lathyrus odoratus 'High Scent' modern grandiflora sweet pea (syn. King's High Scent): Delicate colouring and super scent

These sweet peas are autumn sown and grown in root trainers to promote longer deep roots. They have been grown under a cold polythene tunnel and whilst they are hardy, they are still young and do need that extra bit of protection on cold nights for the first few weeks. Wrap them in some good quality horticultural fleece or bring them in to an unheated greenhouse or conservatory for the night.


  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, humus-rich, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average to fast-growing
  • Flowering period: June to September
  • Hardiness: hardy annual

    The delicate picotee colouring of this sweet pea, coupled with the flowers unusually powerful scent, make this a beautiful addition to the flower garden. Where space is at a premium, try filling large pots with them, and top it with a woven obelisk that they can scramble over. Throughout summer you will have a stunning feature for your terrace.

    In our (not very scientific) sweet pea trial on the nursery, we found that this variety had the most fantastic scent of all. The flowers were held on very long stems approximately 6-9" long, but it only has a few flowers left in August.

    All the sweet-peas in our trial produced significantly better plants when the seeds were sown in autumn rather than spring.

  • Garden care: Incorporate lots of well-rotted organic matter in the planting hole. Feed with a high potash fertiliser, such as Tomorite for plenty of flowers and keep cutting them so that you get plenty more!

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Eventual height & spread

Lovely flowers

4

Grew healthily and produced lovely flowers until the extreme and prolonged heat.

Mrs. B.

Derbyshire

true

Beautiful and abundant

5

beautiful scented blooms the plants gave me months of flowers for my home

Anne Cottage

Essex

true

Fabulous

5

I bought these along with 2 other scented varieties. Previously I haven't had much joy with sweat peas but these provided a beautiful display. There were masses of flowers to cut the stems were long and the fragrances sensational.

Liggit59

Gloucester

true

2000017976

4.7 3

100.0

Can I grow sweet peas in with climbing beans since they are the same height and both need support?

Muddyboots

Hello, Yes, you could grow sweet peas next to your climbing beans, but I would be tempted to grow them on separate wigwams - just in case you pick the wrong ones!

Helen

What does 'pinching out' mean? I would like to buy some Sweet Peas however, I'm not sure what the term 'pinching out the tips' means. Any clues on how you would do this?

Ms Sau Min Chang

Pinching out, simply means removing the growing tip of the plant. This encourages the plants to produce lateral shoots, which will result in bushier growth. All you need to do is nip out the top two leaves and growing point of each plant using your fingers or a small pair of scissors.

Crocus

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In need of support.....

The longer I go on growing my own veg, the more support I need.It was all so simple when I started. All I needed was a few little wigwams. You know the kind of thing; stick five bamboo canes in the ground in a rough circle, tie the tops together and you

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