Hydrangea paniculata Vanille Fraise ('Renhy') (PBR)

2 litre pot £17.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Hydrangea paniculata Vanille Fraise ('Renhy') (PBR) hydrangea: Fabulous white flowers turn pink

This shrub is deciduous so it will lose all its leaves in autumn, then fresh new foliage appears again each spring.

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: moist, well-drained, moderately fertile, humus-rich soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: June to August
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    A welcome addition from French breeders, this plant is already an award winner. Loose pyramid-shaped clusters of flowers form at the tips of red-stemmed branches in summer. They emerge creamy-white and turn shades of pink as they age, before finally taking on rich red and russet tones. Perfect for adding late summer colour to the shrub border, or for creating an informal, flowering hedge.

  • Garden care:To enhance flowering prune hard in early spring, cut back the previous season's shoots to within a few buds of the permanent, woody framework of the plant.

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Eventual height & spread

I wish I could have another one but my garden is too small.

5

It hasn't bloomed yet so the anticipation of what I can look forward to is huge.

Jan

East Kent

true

Lovely plant from the start

5

Good in a shady spot

vasco

Lincoln

true

Pretty

3

Pretty flowers but didn't last long in summer heat. Plant a bit weak and small , hoping will get stronger as matures.

Loveaplant

Derbyshire

false

Lovely

4

Very nice, would recommend

Vw

Brighton

true

We always look to Crocus first

5

Delivered on time in wonderful condition

Kipling

Oxon

true

Lovely plant

5

I've now got two of these lovely plants. The one planted in the ground was the first one and was so pretty I got a second. It was damaged by the delivery driver so I contacted crocus for advice. They offered to replace it straight away but I was happy to try pruning and seeing how it went. Its in a half barrel and has flowered well and is growing strong. It is in a sunny spot and well watered. When the flowers open white its hard to believe they will go on changing to become a deep wine colour.

T

North Yorkshire

true

After the toughest snow last winter

5

Never have I been more happy with a purchase. Now, in August, the huge panicles are starting to turn pink. Such a glorious sight even in the rain today!

Shezza Dorsetlass

Scotland

true

Excellent

5

This plant was beautiful. It flowered in its first year had about 6 heads. Got through the winter, so looking forward to this year's crop.

Cyn

Norfolk

true

Lovely plant, very pretty flowers

5

Lovely plant, very attractive pastel coloured flowers

JoolsC

Leamington Spa

true

Beautiful ever-changing flowers

5

This is a beautiful hydrangea. It needs at least a few hours in the sun to produce flowers, and, like all hydrangeas, it hates being left to dry out. The thin stems will bend right down under the weight of the flowers, so some support would help.The flowers are gorgeous. They start small and lime green in colour, then turn pure white as they grow into sumptuous cones. After a few weeks in the sun, on the same plant, some flowers become light, bright pink with a fine red edge on each petal, and some turn lovely autumnal shades of green and purple. They last in the vase for a very long time. I love this plant!

Bear

Hampshire

true

Hydrangea paniculataVanille Fraise('Renhy') (PBR)

4.5 15

86.7

would this plant be suitable to plant in patio pots

jezz

Hello, This plant can be grown in a large patio pot provided it is kept really well fed and watered, but as it eventually gets quit large it will prefer being in the ground, and a better alternative would be one of the more compact hydrangeas.

Helen

My panicullta was planted in a lage pot last and flowered until late into autumn this year when can I expect to see shoots all my other hydrangeas I have pruned as usual as they have lots of new growth. I can only see slight knobs on the stem no shoots.

Garden proud

Hello, The paniculata hydrangeas are always much later into leaf than the macrophylla types, so you will need to give them another 4 - 6 weeks before you are likely to see signs of growth.

Suggestions for planting low maintenance border please Hello, I recently had my garden extended by a piece of land measuring 34 metres by 14 metres, and my son purchased 23 Phormiums from you in last August on my behalf. I was delighted with the service I received, and the plants appear to be thriving well especially considering the dreadful weather we have suffered this winter. We also bought Rootgrow from you to assist with their development ,and also for use when we moved mature Acers and other shrubs. I still need more shrubs or other types of plants and would appreciate some advice as to what to use. Along one of the 14 metre lengths there is a "hedge" of bamboo plants, and adjacent to these on the return (long) length there is a small rise of earth, tapering down to ground level, with a specimen black bamboo at the end of the mound. There is also a mature acer, which we had to move, situated at the edge of the dividing path (between the lawn) on the field side of the garden. Would it be possible for you to suggest the names of suitable plants which I could purchase from you and which would compliment the existing ones. I am in my eighties and therefore need a very low maintenance garden. I would also like to introduce a little colour if possible. My garden is very exposed and is on quite a windy site. I look forward to your reply.

Marian Burgess

Hello there, There are many plants that might tempt you - here are some of my favourites:- Fatsia japonica http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/fatsia-japonica/classid.3840/ Rodgersia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.rodgersia/cat.plants/ Heuchera http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.heuchera/cat.plants/ Hydrangea paniculata http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.hydrangea-paniculata/ Aucuba japonica http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/aucuba-japonica/classid.277/ Rosa rugosa Alba http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/roses/shrub-rose/hedging/bush-rose/hedging-rose/other-shrub-rose/rosa-rugosa-alba/classid.1148/ Cotoneaster http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.cotoneaster/ Buddleja http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.buddleja/ I hope this helps, Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Specimen Ceanothus or another large bushy shrub.... Good afternoon, When I was first looking for a Ceanothus to replace the one we have in our front garden, I looked on your website, but you only had small ones. Our once lovely Ceanothus has been pruned out of all recognition again this year, as I planted it a bit too near our boundary when it was a baby. I know it may come back, but it is getting ridiculous as every time it grows back it has to be cut back again severely and then ooks a mess for most of the year. Have you got a nice, tall, bushy Ceanothus to replace it? I love my Ceanothus but perhaps if you don't have a big one, do you have another large, flowering shrub as an alternative? Hope you can help Regards Margaret

D DRAKETT

Hello Margaret, it is rare to find larger sized Ceanothus as they are usually quite short-lived and don't normally live longer than 6 - 8 years. We do have a selection of larger shrubs on our site like Hamamelis, Hydrangeas, Magnolias, Acer, Cornus, Cotinus, Philadelphus, Syringa and Viburnum, so you may find something of interest. They will be listed in this section. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Moving Hydrangeas Hello there, I have a wonderful Hydrangea 'Tricolor' which has just finished flowering for this year. However it is now getting too big for its space and I would like to move it. I am wondering if this is possible and if so if now is the best time to do this or if it would be better to wait till the spring. Hope you can help as it is a lovely plant and I do not want to lose it but it is definitely beginning to look unhappy in its current place, although the aspect is appropriate. Thanking you in advance for your time with this. Liz

ldavidson

Dear Helen Thank you so much for your prompt and helpful reply to my email about moving my Hydrangea. I will do as you say as I am very keen for it to survive! Thanks again Liz

Crocus Helpdesk

Hello Liz, The best time to move established shrubs is in the autumn when the soil is still warm but the plant isn't in full active growth - so now is perfect. Begin by marking a circle around the shrub, as wide as the widest branch. Dig a trench along the line of this circle. Use a fork to loosen the soil around the root ball as you go to reduce its size and weight so that it becomes manageable. When the root ball looks about the right size that you can still move it but there are still a lot of roots intact, begin to under cut the root ball with a sharp spade to sever the biggest woody roots. Roll up the root ball in sacking or plastic to protect the roots from damage and drying out. Move the shrub to a pre determined position. It is important to have the site ready so that you can transplant the shrub at once and it isn't left for hours (or worse!) drying out. Remove the sacking and plant the shrub in the new hole, at the depth at which it was previously planted. Firm well, water well and mulch with a good thick layer of well rotted farmyard manure. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

ldavidson

Hydrangea not flowering Hi I have a Hydrangea in my garden. For a few years it was in a pot but for some reason, it only ever seem to flower every other year. The autumn before last, I planted it in the border as it was getting too big to leave in a pot. It didn't flower last year so I was expecting it to bloom this year but it hasn't got a single flower. Around the beginning of the year I noticed the slugs had had a go at it as it was looking poorly. However, I sorted that problem and the foliage is looking really healthy but it still hasn't got a single flower. Any ideas about what could have gone wrong, please? Thanks Sylvia

Sylvia Styles

Hello Sylvia, There are a number of reasons why plants don't flower, but the most likely cause of your problems are either a late frost killing off the buds, or it could be pruning at the wrong time of the year. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Rabbit proof shrubs Dear Sirs We are planning to plant a 30mt long border with flowering shrubs and have assorted colours of Rhododendrons in mind. Our main concern is that the shrubs must be rabbit proof as the border is adjacent to woods and a large grassed area. Also, where possible we would like to have 'flowers' on the shrubs throughout the summer. Would you be able to provide a picking list of suitable shrubs? Thank you for your prompt attention Andy

Clark, Andy (buying)

Hello there, These are really troublesome pests, and there are no effective deterrents available (apart from getting a guard dog) which will be any help to you. They tend to prefer leaves and soft stems rather than flowers and woody stems, and they seem to prefer feeding in exposed positions and often nibble plants at the edge of borders. This habit can be used to the gardener's advantage by planting more valuable subjects in the centre of beds. In winter, when food is scarce, deciduous plants at the edge of beds will not interest rabbits, and will help protect winter flowers in the centre. Below is a list of flowering shrubs which they usually tend to leave alone. Buddleia davidii, Ceanothus Cistus Cotoneaster dammeri Deutzia Hebe Hypericum Hydrangea Mahonia aquifolium Potentilla fructicosa Rhododendron spp. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

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