Fargesia murielae

5 litre pot £59.99
in stock - arrives before Christmas
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Fargesia murielae umbrella bamboo: Medium-sized bamboo with yellow-green arching canes

Bamboos never look their best in winter because the cold, drying winds will often scorch their leaves. In late spring however, new canes will appear bearing a fresh batch of lush foliage.

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average to fast growing
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    This medium-sized bamboo has thin, yellow-green arching canes and a mass of small, soft, mid-green leaves. Its arching habit and fairly speedy rate of growth make it an ideal choice for an informal hedge, and because it is also compact, it makes a lovely, exotic specimen or container plant for small gardens. It is also tolerant of wind and full sun.

  • Garden care: Do not allow to dry out while the plant is getting established. This is a clump-florming bamboo, but if you want to restrict the plant's spread, plant it in a large container, or surround the roots with a non-perishable barrier.

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more info

Eventual height & spread

When is the best time to plant this bamboo?

Palacegarden

Hello there As a general rule fully hardy plants that are grown in containers can be planted at any time of year as long as the soil isn't frozen solid or waterlogged and it isn't freezing. The best times are in the autumn when the soil is still warm enough to encourage root growth but the plant isn't in active growth, or the spring before the temperatures start to rise This bamboo is fully hardy so it can be planted out now.

Hi, could you please recommend a compost so to grow this bamboo in a large pot/planter? Thanks.

Hayley

Hello, These will be very happy growing in John Innes No.2.

Helen

Hello. We have a small south facing garden and would like to plant bamboo to create a screen btw our garden and our neighbours. It is only a small section - about 2m in width and would be looking to get to about 3m high. Is there a bamboo that you would recommend best for this purpose and how many would you need? Also, what size would it arrive as? Think from other questions, the growing time would depend on other external factors-is that right? Sorry for all the questions but a bit new to gardening! Thanks Annabel

newtogardening

Hello, I would recommend something like Phyllostachys Rufa as it is a clump-forming type that does not get too tall. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/fargesia-rufa/classid.2000017340/ It comes in a 5lt pot and is approximately 50cm tall at present. It does have an eventual spread of 1.5m, however I would recommend planting them at 50cm intervals if you want to create a screen. I would also suggest using a bamboo control system to stop it spreading too far into the garden http://www.crocus.co.uk/product/_/bamboo-control-system/classid.2000019273/ Finally, you are right in thinking that the plants growth is determined by external factors, but bamboos tend to have a big surge of growth in mid- to late June. They are thirsty plants so require a lot of water and should be fed with a good general purpose fertiliser such as Vitax Q4 for optimum growth. http://www.crocus.co.uk/product/_/vitax-q4-fertiliser/classid.2000009519/

helen

Hello. We have a small south facing garden and would like to plant bamboo to create a screen btw our garden and our neighbours. It is only a small section - about 2m in width and would be looking to get to about 3m high. Is there a bamboo that you would recommend best for this purpose and how many would you need? Also, what size would it arrive as? Think from other questions, the growing time would depend on other external factors-is that right? Sorry for all the questions but a bit new to gardening! Thanks Annabel

newtogardening

Hello there This bamboo is a possiblity but it can grow to approx 4m tall and has an arching habit so may not be ideal for your garden. Fargesia rufa is probably more suitable as it is a better size,- growing to approx 3m tall by 1.5m wide with more upright to arching canes. They come in 5lt pots and will be between 50-80cm tall when delivered. How fast any plant will grow, as you say, really does depends on external factors such as how much water, light, aspect etc. but these plants are generally classed as average to fast growing. Hope this helps http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/fargesia-rufa/classid.2000017340/

Hello! How tall can I expect this bamboo to be when delivered in a 5 litre pot? Many thanks.

mozartlover

Hello there The 5lt pot Fargesia murielae will be approx 80-100cm tall.

Hello- I want to plant either the Fargesia or Phyllostachys Nigra as hedging along a fence line border 10m long x 1m wide. the bed/border is raised 60cm off ground using timber sleepers.the soil is contained at the back by a 15mm thick plywood and then another 50mm gap to the fence. My question is whether or not I still need to worry about installing root barrier given that the bamboo roots will already be "contained " as such within this wooden raised bed.. ie can they still spread down and under the bed/fence to neighbour, or can the roots pierce plywood ?..am only asking because root barrier is not cheap and do not want to install it if unnecessary..many thanks for any advice

Induna38

Hello there The plywood should container the roots at the back for a time but eventually this may breakdown and the roots could break through, - we recommend a thick wall of concrete or something that is very solid, but also you would definitely need some form of barrier to stop the roots going down and under, and this barrier needs to be at least 1m deep. Hope this helps

Roof garden suggestions Dear Sirs, I am thinking about adding bamboos into pots on my roof here in London which generally gets as lot of sun. However, at a local nursery the resident gardener frowned when I mentioned my idea, - but they did not have the bamboo in stock that day anyway. Can you recommend a bamboo variety that would do well on a roof, in containers? My roof (5th floor building) adjoins another and I was thinking of placing the bamboo pots against the adjoining buildings brick wall. Regards, Alex

Lengyel, Alex

Hello Alex, The bamboo that copes best with exposed positions is Fargesia murieliae http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/bamboo/exotics/fargesia-murieliae-/classid.1583/ however all bamboos are incredibly thirsty and therefore will need to be watered all the time if they are on a roof terrace - which is probably why he pulled a face! I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Can I grow a Bamboo in a pot? Dear Sir Please can you tell me if I can grow a bamboo in a 2ft deep window type box for a patio? Thanks Roger

roger pannell

Hello Roger, As long as you make sure you keep it really well fed and watered, it should be fine as long as it is nice and wide. After a couple of years though it will need to be planted in the ground - as will most things that grow to a good size. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Can I plant my Bamboo in the ground in a pot with drainage holes? I have a couple of largish bamboos that I wish to plant in a pot in the ground. However, the plastic pots have drainage holes in the bottom. I know that bamboo can become extremely invasive (which is why I wish to plant them in pots). Will the roots go through the holes in the bottom? Or should I use pots without drainage holes? If so, will the bamboo survive with no drainage? Or is there a special type of pot for this purpose? Many thanks. Anne

Anne Lear

Hello Anne, The bamboos will not survive without drainage holes in the bottom of the pots, so this is essential. Sadly though even a tough plastic will deteriorate over time and may crack and split, so they will certainly help, but in the very long term the plants may break out. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Anne Lear

Can certain types of bamboo be non-invasive? I have, apparently, a black bamboo. Many thanks Anne

Anne Lear

Hello again Anne, The Phyllostachys nigra is classified as non-invasive (or clump-forming), but even so it has an eventual spread of 3m. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Advice on Bamboo and Liriope Hi, I have a typically small back yard at my London Victorian terrace house. I have my heart set on bamboo and would like your advice on the best variety to buy. The width of the area I am looking to plant is just over 4 metres. I don't want it to spread and I don't want it to intrude too much in terms of depth and bushiness as it's a small garden. The one I'm looking at from your website is... Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. spectabilis - showy yellow-grove bamboo. Is this the right sort of thing? Or any other suggestions? How many plants would I need to buy to fit in the 4m width? Thanks Regards, Gabrielle

Gabrielle Kilpatrick

Hello Gabrielle, The Phyllostachys aureosulcata f. spectabilis is a spreading bamboo and has an eventual spread of 6m, so it is not ideal. A better option would be either Fargesia murieliae http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/bamboo/exotics/fargesia-murieliae-/classid.1583/ or Phyllostachys nigra http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/bamboo/exotics/phyllostachys-nigra-/classid.1601/ Both of these are clump-forming, however even these will need to be dug up or 'managed' if you want them not to spread, as even the smallest one will get 1.5m cross. If you are trying to create a hedge effect, then I would recommend planting them at 50cm intervals. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Hello, Many thanks for this advice. I think I will go with the Phyllostachys nigra. Now for another question........ I have 2 garden beds - both are 5 metres long and 50cm deep. One has a width of 30cm and is mostly shade. The other has a width of 15cm and has partial sun. Do you think Liriope would go well in both of these? How far apart do you space Liriope? Regards, Gabrielle

Gabrielle Kilpatrick

Hello again Gabrielle, Liriope will grow just about anywhere so they will be a good choice - although they will need more water in the sunnier position. As for spacing, I would plant them at around 20cm intervals. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

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