Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae

2 litre pot £11.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae wood spurge: Great for a woodland setting

  • Position: partial shade
  • Soil: moist, well-drained garden soil
  • Rate of growth: fast growing
  • Flowering period: April to June
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    A compact, shade-loving, spreading euphorbia that has long-lasting, lime-green flowers in late spring above rosettes of glossy, dark green leaves. It's a valuable plant for difficult areas of dry shade, particularly under trees and it also looks at home in a woodland setting. As it is evergreen and suckering it also makes attractive groundcover. Left unchecked it can become invasive, romping through areas of a small garden.

  • Garden care: In autumn cut back the faded flower stems, avoiding new ones. When working with spurges always wear gloves since the milky sap is poisonous and a potential skin irritant. Remove unwanted seedlings each spring as part of routine border maintenance

  • CAUTION toxic if eaten/skin & eye irritant
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Eventual height & spread

Notes on Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae

"Light up deep shade with this rambling euphorbia and its butter-yellow spring bracts -made brighter by glossy dark rosettes"

Vigorous & Bushy

5

Received in good condition and planted out in a shady spot last Autumn. It has grown well, despite the dry summer and is well on the way to being a substantial bush.

Caroline

Aylesbury

good for north facing

4

growing well in north facing clay soil

Heronette

Lymington, Hamshire

true

Superb garden structure

5

Long-lived vivid flowers that last for months, possibly longer than any other Euphorbia. Self-seeds vigorously which is a bonus as plant-lovers beg for offshoots.

Beer Terrace

Brockley

true

Euphorbia amygdaloidesvar.robbiae

4.7 3

100.0

I look after a large garden which has a large banked area, planted up with Euonymous, cornus, buddleia, philadelphus and quercus ilex, the euphorbia is used as a filler in the corners. Over the last 2 winters they have gradually rotted off, could you suggest an alternative please

Sylvia's Potting Shed

Hello, I am not sure why the Euphorbias have not flourished as generally they are pretty tough, but 'rotting off' sounds as though the the area is quite boggy. With this in mind, it might be worth trying one of the following... Ajuga http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.ajuga/sort.0/ Hedera http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.hedera/sort.0/ Pachysandra http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.pachysandra/sort.0/ Bergenia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.bergenia/sort.0/

Helen

HI, Given their habit for spreading how far apart should I plant a group of these?

Arthurtutor

Hello, It really depends on how impatient you are. They will eventually spread up to 1m across, so in theory you could plant them 1m apart, but for a more a more immediate impact, I would recommend planting at 45cm intervals.

What plants would you recommend for my Mediterranean style garden? Our garden is quite well established and has a Mediterranean feel. We have quite a few spaces that need filling and were hoping you could suggest a few things?

Mrs C Taylor

We have several plants that might interest you - here are some of the best Lavandula http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.lavandula/?s=lavandula Cistus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.cistus/?s=cistus Kniphofia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.kniphofia/?s=kniphofia Euphorbias http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.euphorbia/?s=euphorbia Yucca filamentosa http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/yucca-filamentosa-/classid.4537/ Eryngium http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.eryngium/?s=eryngium Sedum http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.sedum/?s=sedum Brachyglottis http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/mediterranean-plants/brachyglottis-dunedin-group-sunshine/classid.4376/ Convolvulus cneorum http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/mediterranean-plants/convolvulus-cneorum-/classid.940/

Crocus

What can I plant in a Mediterranean style garden? I want give my garden a Mediterranean look but I do not know what to plant. Could you please help?

[email protected]

There are quite a few plants that we sell on the website which will give you a mediterranean feel to your garden - here are some of the best any of the Kniphofias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=kniphofia any of the Euphorbias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euphorbia Yucca filamentosa http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=yucca+fil Stipa tenuissima http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1000000022&CategoryID= any of the Eryngiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=eryngium any of the Sedum spectabile http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=sedum+spect any of the Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Erigeron http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=erigeron Brachyglottis compacta Sunshine http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=4376&CategoryID= Convolvulus cneorum http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=940&CategoryID= Phlomis italica http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=phlomis Lavandula x intermedia Dutch Group http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=4046&CategoryID= Festuca glauca http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=Festuca+glauc&x=12&y=10

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