Buy Japanese shield fern Dryopteris erythrosora: £5.99 Delivery by Crocus

Dryopteris erythrosora

9cm pot £5.99
in stock
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Dryopteris erythrosora Japanese shield fern: Desirable fern for partial shade

  • Position: partial shade
  • Soil: moist, humus-rich soil
  • Rate of growth: slow-growing
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    This striking deciduous fern has triangular-shaped fronds, which are coppery-red when young and slowly mature to dark green. One of our recommended plants, it needs plenty of moisture and contrasts beautifully with evergreen ferns and other woodland plants.

  • Garden care: Incorporate lots of well-rotted leaf mould, composted pine needles or garden compost into the planting hole. Cut back decayed fronds in winter to allow new growth to emerge.

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  • Standard £4.99
  • Next / named day £6.99
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Eventual height & spread

Notes on Dryopteris erythrosora

"The autumn fern has a russet-red underside to its leaves but it’s still pristine enough to flatter snowdrops in early winter- before its new red-backed fronds appear"

Perky little chap that likes a bit of shade

5

This dear little fern loves the side of the house where there is no a lot of sun and it tends to be a bit damaging he's survived the winter snow and looks quit healthy

HB

London

true

Great plant including for difficult spot

5

Only planted this year. But so far extremely attractive plant, with lovely colour as leaves unfurl. It's December now and still in full Undamaged leaf - so evergreen quality looks v promising, and in shady position under deciduous trees.

Pauline

Leeds

true

I would definitely buy more of this plant

5

I wanted fern for interest but this particular fern gives more than that as it has a gorgeous copper tinge which adds extra colour. Will certainly buy more.

Pearl

Wales

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2000011776

5.0 3

100.0

Help with plants for N/East facing garden Hi, I have a little problem choosing some plants....... I really like the look and size of the 'Shady Pink' pre-designed corner planting plan, but our problem is that we have a north east facing garden, so we get no sun at all in the winter, and direct sun for only half a day on either side of the garden during the summer. Would this planting plan be suitable for that level of shade? We are actually are buying plants for the entire garden, so we'd need about 6 new shrubs, and maybe a small tree (we were thinking about the Prunus Amanogawa). Could you please help us with a few shrubs that would do well in these conditions? For perennials, we have been recommended; - Geranium Johnson's Blue, Kniphofia, Crocosmia, and Helleborus foetidus. Are these suitable? Many many thanks! Regards, Josee

Josee Mallet

Hello Josee, It is always difficult to give a definitive answer to the shade issue, but looking at the Shady Pink border, the most shade tolerant plants include Anemone hupehensis Hadspen Abundance, Thalictrum aquilegiifolium and Dryopteris erythrosora. If you click on the following link it will take you to all our shade-loving shrubs http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/plcid.1/vid.11/ and for the shade -loving perennials http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/plcid.2/vid.11/ Of the plants you have listed, the Prunus, Helleborus foetidus, Kniphofia and Crocosmia will be OK as long as there is more sun than shade. I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Which plants are Deer proof? I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.

david

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

What can I plant that the deers won't eat? What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.

Kelly L. Sliker

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

Crocus

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