Aquilegia vulgaris var. stellata 'Ruby Port'

9cm pot £5.99
within 4 weeks
3 × 9cm pots £17.97 £15.00
within 4 weeks
Quantity 1 Plus Minus
Buy Aquilegia vulgaris var. stellata 'Ruby Port' granny's bonnet: Stunning, double, ruby-red flowers

This perennial dies back to below ground level each year in autumn, then fresh new growth appears again in spring.

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average to fast-growing
  • Flowering period: May to June
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Fully double, deep maroon, nodding flowers sit on top of stiffly upright stems from early summer. The rich colour of this columbine works well with other ‘bruised’ tones, sulphur yellows and acid greens.

  • Garden care: Lift and divide large clumps in early spring and apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted manure or garden compost around the plant. Divided specimens may take some time to establish since they don't like having their roots disturbed.

Delivery options
  • Standard £4.99
  • Click & collect FREE
more info

Eventual height & spread

beautiful plant

5

Small plant and didn't flower first year as planted late but has been flowering every year since I have lots of slugs but luckily they have not eaten these I have also grown new plants from the seeds which was very easy and there are lots of seeds I grow it behind rudbeckias which get larger and almost cover them in summer

Maria

Solihull

true

Beautiful, but slugs love it!

4

Beautiful as all aquilegia are. Unfortunately the slugs and snails love to eat it. A little disappointed as it was sold as part of a slug resistant plant!

Pixi

Essex

Gorgeous colour!

5

Beautiful colour, tall so stands above other plants, healthy plants. Doesn't seem to be winter hardy, but it is in a shadier part of the garden.

Blakestie

Burton upon Trent

true

didnt thrive for me

3

attractive flowers but didnt do anything the second year which could have been my fault-maybe planted in wrong place?

pats

bristol

Aquilegia vulgarisvar.stellata'Ruby Port'

4.3 4

100.0

does this variety stay true from year to year and from self seeded plants Thankyou

joan

Hello, Most aquilegias (including this one) are promiscuous, so their seedlings often differ from the parent plant.

helen

2006 Planting Chelsea Flower Show enquiry Hi, I see you have plants available for the current show, but do you have a plant list for the 2006 award winner (Daily Telegraph,Tom Stuart Smith) available as I am interested in buying some of these plants? Thank you for your time, Kelly

kelly mackenzie

Hello Kelly, He did use a lot of plants in his garden - here is a list which includes most. Allium Purple Sensation Anthriscus Ravens Wing Aquilegia Ruby Port Astrantia Claret Carex testacea Cirsium rivulare atropurpureum Dahlia Dark Desire Euphorbia Fireglow Geranium Lily Lovell Geranium phaeum Samobor Geranium Phillipe Valpelle Geranium psilostemmon Geum Princess Juliana Gillenia trifoliata Hakonechloa macra Iris Dusky Challenger Iris Dutch Chocolate Iris Sultan's Palace Iris Superstition Iris Supreme Sultan Knautia macedonica Lavandula angustifolia Nepeta subsessilis Washfield Nepeta Walkers low Purple fennel - Giant Bronze Rodgersia pinnata Superba Rodgersia podophylla Salvia Mainacht Sedum matrona Stachys byzantina Stipa arundinacea (syn.Anemanthele lessoniana) Stipa gigantea Tulip Abu Hassan Tulip Ballerina Tulip Queen of Night Verbascum Helen Johnston I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Crocus Helpdesk

Growing plants for a wedding Dear Crocus, I am a very happy customer ..... I love your site, plants and service. I learnt about you first from Arabella Lennox-Boyd. But now I am writing for some advice please. My sister is getting married in Oxfordshire on the last weekend of May. I would love to grow the flowers for the wedding. I have a big garden with empty beds and a green house at my disposal. Could you give me some advice on types of cut flowers that would be in bloom at the end of May? Some pointers as a place to start my research and buying would be fantastic. Thank you very much, Best wishes, Kate

Kate Olivia Higginbottom

Thank you so much Helen - amazing! I'll send you photos of the finished results. Best wishes and thanks again, Kate

Crocus Helpdesk

Hello Kate, It will be a little hit and miss as a lot will depend on the weather, but the following plants should be in flower around that time. Choisya ternata http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/choisya-ternata-/classid.825/ Osmanthus x burkwoodii http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/osmanthus-%C3%97-burkwoodii-/classid.4171/ Syringa http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.syringa/ Viburnum x carlcephalum http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/viburnum-%C3%97-carlcephalum-/classid.4460/ Convallaria majalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.convallaria/ Iris http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.iris/ Paeonia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.paeonia/ Euphorbia palustris http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/euphorbia-palustris-/classid.2794/ Aquilegia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.aquilegia/ Ceanothus Skylark http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/ceanothus-thyrsiflorus-skylark/classid.728/ and if we have a hot start to the summer a couple of roses or some of the earlier lavenders may have started too. I hope this gives you lots of ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Kate Olivia Higginbottom

Aquilegias - nectar-rich and lovely

These cottage garden essentials take their name from Aquila, Latin for eagle, because the nectar-rich spurs at the back of the flower resemble eagle's talons. Their other common name, columbine, is also related to a bird. If you turn the flowers upside d

Read full article